Journal of Pediatric Neurosciences
NEUROIMAGING
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 15  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 336--337

Orbital apex syndrome: a clinico-anatomical diagnosis


Lokesh Saini1, Biswaroop Chakrabarty1, Atin Kumar2, Sheffali Gulati1 
1 Division of Child Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Radiodiagnosis, Jai Prakash Narayan Apex Trauma Center, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Sheffali Gulati
Centre of Excellence and Advanced Research on Childhood Neurodevelopmental Disorders, Division of Child Neurology, Department of Pediatrics, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi.
India

An 8-month-old girl presented with fever, restricted left eye movements and increasing proptosis for 8 days. On examination she had left orbital cellulitis, relative afferent pupillary defect and ophthalmoplegia. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) brain with orbits revealed orbital apex syndrome (OAS) with cavernous sinus thrombosis. Orbital apex is located posteriorly in the orbit and characterised by involvement of cranial nerves II, III, IV, VI and ophthalmic division of Vth nerve. The close clinico-anatomical differentials of OAS are cavernous sinus and superior orbital fissure syndrome. The current case was treated successfully with intravenous antibiotics and anticoagulation therapy.


How to cite this article:
Saini L, Chakrabarty B, Kumar A, Gulati S. Orbital apex syndrome: a clinico-anatomical diagnosis.J Pediatr Neurosci 2020;15:336-337


How to cite this URL:
Saini L, Chakrabarty B, Kumar A, Gulati S. Orbital apex syndrome: a clinico-anatomical diagnosis. J Pediatr Neurosci [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Jan 22 ];15:336-337
Available from: https://www.pediatricneurosciences.com/article.asp?issn=1817-1745;year=2020;volume=15;issue=3;spage=336;epage=337;aulast=Saini;type=0