Journal of Pediatric Neurosciences
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2020  |  Volume : 15  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 245--251

Comparing sedative effect of dexmedetomidine versus midazolam for sedation of children while undergoing computerized tomography imaging


Reza Azizkhani1, Farhad Heydari1, Mohammadreza Ghazavi2, Maryam Riahinezhad3, Mohammadreza Habibzadeh4, Ali Bigdeli1, Keihan Golshani1, Saeid Majidinejad1, Abolfazl Mohammadbeigi5 
1 Department of Emergency Medicine, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
2 Department of Pediatrics, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
3 Department of Radiology, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
4 Department of Anesthesiology, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
5 Neuroscience Research Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Qom University of Medical Sciences, Qom, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Abolfazl Mohammadbeigi
Neuroscience Research Center, Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Qom University of Medical Sciences, Qom.
Iran

Background: Pediatric anxiety and restlessness may create issues and difficulties in performing accurate diagnostic studies even noninvasive ones, such as radiological imaging. There are some agents that will help to get this goal. This study aimed to compare the intranasal effect of dexmedetomidine (DEX) and midazolam (MID) for sedation parameters of children undergoing computerized tomography (CT) imaging. Materials and Methods: A double-blind clinical trial was conducted on 162 eligible children who underwent CT imaging. These patients were divided into two groups including MID (n = 81) with dose of 0.3 mg.kg and DEX (n = 81) with dose of 3 μg.kg, which was consumed intranasally. The mean blood pressure (MBP), respiratory rate (RR), heart rate (HR), and oxygen saturation (O2Sat) in children were recorded. Then, time of initiation, level of sedation, and duration effect of medication were measured at 0, 10, 20, and 30 min. Parents and clinician satisfaction score was asked. All data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences (SPSS) software by t test and chi-square test. Results: Decreasing in MBP and HR was higher in DEX group than MID group (P < 0.001), whereas decrease of O2Sat in MID group was higher than DEX group (0.009). Starting time of sedation (22.72 ± 11.64 vs. 33.38 ± 10.17, P = 0.001) was lower in DEX group. Parents (P < 0.001) and physician (P < 0.001) satisfaction score was higher in DEX group than the MID group. Conclusion: Using 3 μg/kg intranasal DEX for sedation of 1–6-year-old children was a suitable method to undergo noninvasive studies such as CT imaging. Intranasal DEX is superior to MID due to higher sedation satisfactory, faster starting effect of sedation, and lower side effects and complications. Nevertheless, in children with hemodynamic instability DEX is not an appropriate choice.


How to cite this article:
Azizkhani R, Heydari F, Ghazavi M, Riahinezhad M, Habibzadeh M, Bigdeli A, Golshani K, Majidinejad S, Mohammadbeigi A. Comparing sedative effect of dexmedetomidine versus midazolam for sedation of children while undergoing computerized tomography imaging.J Pediatr Neurosci 2020;15:245-251


How to cite this URL:
Azizkhani R, Heydari F, Ghazavi M, Riahinezhad M, Habibzadeh M, Bigdeli A, Golshani K, Majidinejad S, Mohammadbeigi A. Comparing sedative effect of dexmedetomidine versus midazolam for sedation of children while undergoing computerized tomography imaging. J Pediatr Neurosci [serial online] 2020 [cited 2021 Jan 25 ];15:245-251
Available from: https://www.pediatricneurosciences.com/article.asp?issn=1817-1745;year=2020;volume=15;issue=3;spage=245;epage=251;aulast=Azizkhani;type=0