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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 15  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 231-237

Comparison the oral premedication of midazolam, dexmedetomidine, and melatonin for children’s sedation and ease of separation from parents before anesthesia


1 Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Arak University of Medical Sciences, Arak, Iran
2 Department of Student Research Committee, Arak University of Medical Sciences, Arak, Iran

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Hesameddin Modir
Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care, Arak University of Medical Sciences, Arak.
Iran
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jpn.JPN_95_19

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Background: Children’s fear of surgery and preoperative separation from parents can contribute to anxiety and distress in children undergoing surgery. The study addressed the comparable efficacy of oral premedication of midazolam, dexmedetomidine, and melatonin to alleviate preoperative anxiety and easing the children’s separation from parents. Materials and Methods: A double-blinded trial enrolled three equal-sized groups of children (n = 153, aged 2–10 years) undergoing elective surgery who received oral midazolam, melatonin, and dexmedetomidine 30 min before induction. The observation sedation score, and ease of separation, acceptance of drug both preceding and following premedication administration were assessed and recorded every 5min till anesthesia induction. Results: A significant difference was observed in the mean scores of sedation before premedication and after separation from parents, as well as in the degree of the separation when comparing between the midazolam and melatonin groups and the dexmedetomidine and melatonin groups (P < 0.001). The scores were significantly lower in the melatonin group than the other two groups, whereas no significant difference was found in those between the midazolam and dexmedetomidine groups, as well as in the acceptance of anesthesia induction between the midazolam and melatonin groups (P = 0.250). The differences were significant between the midazolam and dexmedetomidine groups (P = 0.002) and melatonin and dexmedetomidine groups (P < 0.001) and anesthesia induction was effective in the dexmedetomidine group than that in the other two groups. Conclusion: Dexmedetomidine is more effective in acceptance of anesthesia induction. Furthermore, the midazolam and dexmedetomidine groups indicated better ease of separation and sedation scores than melatonin.






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