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LETTER TO EDITOR
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 13  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 283
 

Primary Ewing’s sarcoma of cranium in a pediatric patient


Department of Pediatrics, Al-Kindy College of Medicine, University of Baghdad, Baghdad, Iraq

Date of Web Publication5-Jul-2018

Correspondence Address:
Mahmood D Al-Mendalawi
P.O.Box 55302, Baghdad Post Office, Baghdad
Iraq
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/JPN.JPN_166_17

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   Abstract 




How to cite this article:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Primary Ewing’s sarcoma of cranium in a pediatric patient. J Pediatr Neurosci 2018;13:283

How to cite this URL:
Al-Mendalawi MD. Primary Ewing’s sarcoma of cranium in a pediatric patient. J Pediatr Neurosci [serial online] 2018 [cited 2022 Jan 23];13:283. Available from: https://www.pediatricneurosciences.com/text.asp?2018/13/2/283/235946




Sir,

I read with interest the case report by Sharma et al.[1] on the primary Ewing’s sarcoma (ES) of cranium in an Indian child. It is obvious that due to poor immunity, individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are at increased risk to various neoplasms compared to the immunocompetent individuals.[2] To my knowledge, HIV infection is an important health threat in India. Although no recent data are present on the pediatric HIV seroprevalence, the available data pointed out to the substantial HIV seroprevalence rate of 1.03% among pregnant women in India.[3] Regrettably, the HIV status of the mother was unknown. I presume that some sort of vertical HIV transmission ought to be expected in the studied child. Hence, arrangement for the diagnostic set of CD4 count and viral overload estimations was envisaged in the studied child. If that diagnostic set was performed and it disclosed underlying HIV infection, the case in question could truly widen the spectrum of HIV-associated skeletal ES rarely reported in the literature.[4]

Financial support and sponsorship

Nil.

Conflicts of interest

There are no conflicts of interest.



 
   References Top

1.
Sharma AD, Singh J, Bhattacharya J. Primary Ewing’s sarcoma of cranium in a pediatric patient. J Pediatr Neurosci 2017;13:273-5.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.
Ji Y, Lu H. Malignancies in HIV-infected and AIDS patients. Adv Exp Med Biol 2017;13:167-79.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.
Sibia P, Mohi MK, Kumar A. Seroprevalence of human immunodeficiency virus among antenatal women in one of the institute of northern India. J Clin Diagn Res 2016;13:QC08-9.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Lyall EG, Langdale-Brown B, Eden OB, Mok JY, Croft NM. Ewing’s sarcoma in a child with human immunodeficiency virus (type 1) infection. Med Pediatr Oncol 1993;13:127-31.  Back to cited text no. 4
    




 

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