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LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 12  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 302-303
 

Parainfectious ocular flutter and truncal ataxia and dengue


Department of Tropical Medicine, Hainan Medical University, Hainan Sheng, China

Date of Web Publication14-Nov-2017

Correspondence Address:
Viroj Wiwanitkit
Department of Tropical Medicine, Hainan Medical University, Hainan Sheng
China
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/jpn.JPN_75_17

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How to cite this article:
Wiwanitkit V. Parainfectious ocular flutter and truncal ataxia and dengue. J Pediatr Neurosci 2017;12:302-3

How to cite this URL:
Wiwanitkit V. Parainfectious ocular flutter and truncal ataxia and dengue. J Pediatr Neurosci [serial online] 2017 [cited 2020 Nov 26];12:302-3. Available from: https://www.pediatricneurosciences.com/text.asp?2017/12/3/302/218245




Dear Sir,

The publication on “Parainfectious Ocular Flutter and Truncal Ataxia and Dengue” is very interesting.[1] Mahale et al. concluded that “There are reported cases of opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia in association with dengue virus infection. However, there are no reported cases of parainfectious ocular flutter and truncal ataxia in association with dengue virus infection.[1]” In fact, the ocular and neurological complication due to dengue is not uncommon and become the problem in clinical management.[2] Nevertheless, the case report by Mahale et al. is not the first case report. There are at least previous case reports in the previous literature mentioned by Sakdisornchai et al.[3] and Tan et al.[4] Furthermore, a possible concurrent disorder that might result in ocular problem and ataxia is usually not ruled out in reported cases.[5]

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   References Top

1.
Mahale RR, Mehta A, Buddaraju K, Srinivasa R. Parainfectious ocular flutter and truncal ataxia in association with dengue fever. J Pediatr Neurosci 2017;12:91-2.  Back to cited text no. 1
[PUBMED]  [Full text]  
2.
Wiwanitkit V. Dengue fever: Diagnosis and treatment. Expert Rev Anti Infect Ther 2010;8:841-5.  Back to cited text no. 2
[PUBMED]    
3.
Sakdisornchai K, Sringean J, Jitkritsadakul O, Bhidayasiri R. Opsoclonus myoclonus ataxia syndrome in a seronegative patient with disseminated cryptococcosis: The first case report. Mov Disord [abstract]. Mov Disord 2016;31 (Suppl 2).  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.
Tan AH, Linn K, Ramli NM, Hlaing CS, Aye AM, Sam IC, et al. Opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome associated with dengue virus infection. Parkinsonism Relat Disord 2014;20:1309-10.  Back to cited text no. 4
[PUBMED]    
5.
Wiwanitkit V. Opsoclonus-myoclonus-ataxia syndrome associated with dengue. Parkinsonism Relat Disord 2015;21:159.  Back to cited text no. 5
[PUBMED]    




 

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