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 CASE REPORT
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 11  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 335-337

Managing tracheal extubation in infants with stridor and congenital neuraxial anomalies


1 Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, GB Pant Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, New Delhi, India
2 Department of Neurosurgery, GB Pant Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, New Delhi, India

Correspondence Address:
Pragati Ganjoo
Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, GB Pant Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research, JL Nehru Marg, New Delhi - 110 002
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1817-1745.199472

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Stridor is a serious complication of congenital neuraxial anomalies, which though, can get completely resolved with early neurosurgical correction of the anomaly. However, stridor relief may or may not be achieved soon after surgery. Persistent postoperative stridor can potentially cause extubation failure that may be difficult to handle in small children. There are no extubation guidelines for difficult pediatric airways as yet, and fewer appropriate airway-assist devices for routine use. Management of an infant with occipital encephalocele, hydrocephalus and bilateral abductor vocal cord palsy, who developed post-extubation respiratory distress due to stridor is discussed, together with the relevant tracheal extubation issues in such cases.






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