home : about us : ahead of print : current issue : archives search instructions : subscriptionLogin 
Users online: 1274      Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size Print this page Email this page
 CASE REPORT
Year : 2015  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 133-136

Isolated thoracic (D5) intramedullary epidermoid cyst without spinal dysraphism: A rare case report


Department of Neurosurgery, S. C. B. Medical College, Cuttack, Odisha, India

Correspondence Address:
Mani Charan Satapathy
Department of Neurosurgery, S. C. B. Medical College, Cuttack, Odisha - 753 001
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1817-1745.159206

Rights and Permissions

Spinal epidermoid cyst, congenital or acquired, is mainly congenital associated with spinal dysraphism, rarely in isolation. Intramedullary epidermoid cysts (IECs) are rare with less than 60 cases reported so far; isolated variety (i.e., without spinal dysraphism) is still rarer. Complete microsurgical excision is the dictum of surgical treatment. A 14-year-old boy presented with 4-month history of upper backache accompanied with progressive descending paresthesia with paraparesis with early bladder and bowel involvement. His condition deteriorated rapidly making him bedridden. Neurological examination revealed upper thoracic myeloradiculopathy probably of neoplastic origin with sensory localization to D5 spinal level. Digital X-ray revealed no feature suggestive of spinal dysraphism. Contrast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) characteristics clinched the presumptive diagnosis. Near-total microsurgical excision was done leaving behind a small part of the calcified capsule densely adhered to cord. Histopathological features were confirmative of an epidermoid cyst. Postoperatively, he improved significantly with a gain of motor power sufficient to walk without support within a span of 6 months. Spinal IECs, without any specific clinical presentation, are often diagnosed based upon intraoperative and histopathological findings, however early diagnosis is possible on complete MRI valuation. Complete microsurgical excision, resulting in cessation of clinical progression and remission of symptoms, has to be limited to sub-total or near-total excision if cyst is adherent to cord or its confines.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1614    
    Printed23    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded97    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal