home : about us : ahead of print : current issue : archives search instructions : subscriptionLogin 
Users online: 314      Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size Print this page Email this page
 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 9  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 115-120

Neuropsychological implications of adjunctive levetiracetam in childhood epilepsy


1 IRCCS Institute of Neurological Sciences of Bologna; Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
2 Child Neurology Unit, S. Maria Nuova Hospital, Reggio Emilia, Italy
3 Child Neurology and Psychiatry Unit, Infermi Hospital, Rimini, Italy
4 IRCCS Institute of Neurological Sciences of Bologna, Bologna, Italy
5 Child Neurology and Psychiatry Unit, Policlinico S. Orsola-Malpighi; Department of Medical and Surgical Sciences, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy

Correspondence Address:
Annio Posar
Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, University of Bologna, IRCCS Institute of Neurological Sciences of Bologna, Child Neurology and Psychiatry Unit, Via Altura 3, 40139 Bologna
Italy
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1817-1745.139282

Rights and Permissions

Introduction: Levetiracetam (LEV) is an effective antiepileptic drug also used in childhood and adolescence. Literature data regarding the long-term effects of LEV in childhood epilepsy and based on extensive neuropsychological evaluations using standardized tools are still scanty. Our study aimed to address this topic. Materials and Methods: We studied 10 patients with epilepsy characterized by focal or generalized seizures (4 boys, 6 girls; mean age: 10 years 8 months; range: 6 years 2 months - 16 years 2 months), treated with adjunctive LEV during a follow-up of 12 months. In 6 patients electroencephalogram (EEG) showed continuous spike and waves during sleep. Using standardized tools, we performed seriated assessments of cognitive and behavioral functioning in relation to seizure and EEG outcome. Results: Six patients completed the trial after 12 months of treatment; 1 patient dropped out of the study after 9 months, 3 patients after 6 months. Adjunctive LEV was effective on seizures in 3/10 patients and on EEG in 2/10 patients, and was well tolerated in all examined cases. Overall, no worsening of cognitive or behavioral functions has been detected during the period of the study; even at 6 and 12 months from baseline, an improvement in patients' abstract reasoning has been found, that was not related to seizure or EEG outcome. Conclusions: In our population of children and adolescents, LEV had no adverse cognitive or behavioral effects, short- or long-term. We found an improvement of abstract reasoning, regardless of seizure and EEG outcome.






[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*


        
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed18469    
    Printed36    
    Emailed1    
    PDF Downloaded599    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal