<%server.execute "isdev.asp"%> The risk of seizure recurrence after a first unprovoked seizure in childhood: A prospective study Jagtap SA, Mauskar A, Naik N - J Pediatr Neurosci
home : about us : ahead of print : current issue : archives search instructions : subscriptionLogin 
Users online: 1285      Small font sizeDefault font sizeIncrease font size Print this page Email this page


 
  Table of Contents    
LETTER TO THE EDITOR
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 73-74
 

The risk of seizure recurrence after a first unprovoked seizure in childhood: A prospective study


1 Department of Neurology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute of Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum, Kerala, India
2 Department of Pediatrics, Lokmanya Tilak Municipal Medical College and General Hospital, Sion, Mumbai, India

Date of Web Publication6-May-2013

Correspondence Address:
Sujit Abajirao Jagtap
Department of Neurology, Sree Chitra Tirunal Institute of Medical Sciences and Technology, Trivandrum - 695 011, Kerala
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1817-1745.111435

Rights and Permissions

 



How to cite this article:
Jagtap SA, Mauskar A, Naik N. The risk of seizure recurrence after a first unprovoked seizure in childhood: A prospective study. J Pediatr Neurosci 2013;8:73-4

How to cite this URL:
Jagtap SA, Mauskar A, Naik N. The risk of seizure recurrence after a first unprovoked seizure in childhood: A prospective study. J Pediatr Neurosci [serial online] 2013 [cited 2019 Oct 17];8:73-4. Available from: http://www.pediatricneurosciences.com/text.asp?2013/8/1/73/111435


Dear Sir,

Seizures are common in pediatric age group and occur in approximately 10% of children. The occurrence of a single unprovoked seizure in childhood deserves careful consideration. [1] The present study was undertaken to evaluate the risk of seizure recurrence and associated risk factors after a first unprovoked seizure (FUS) in Indian children after12 months. This prospective observational study was carried out at a tertiary care teaching institute during the period of May 2007 to February 2010. Patients between age group of 1month to12 years of age with FUS were included. Patients with and without antiepileptic drug (AED) were included in the study. All children were prospectively followed for a minimum of 12 months. There were 40 children, 25 males, 8 (45.0%) were below 5 years. Five had significant birth history and two of them had developmental delay. Six (15.0%) patients had past history of febrile seizures, 3 (7.5%) had abnormal central nervous system (CNS) examination. Twenty nine (72.5%) patients had generalized convulsion, out of which 4 (10.0%) presented in cluster. Eleven (27.5%) had focal convulsion, 3 (7.5%) had simple partial and 8 (20.0%) had complex partial seizures. Eight (20%) presented as status epileptics (SE). Eight (20%) patients had abnormal electroencephalogram (EEG). In all eleven patients with focal seizures computerized tomography (CT) head was normal. AEDs were started in15 (37.5%) patients. Eight (20%) had recurrence within 12 month of FUS. Five of 29 patients with generalized seizures and 2 out of 10 SE patients had recurrence. Those who presented with clustering of seizures had no recurrence. 3/8 patients with abnormal EEG, 2/15 patients on AED and 6/25 without AED, had recurrence [Table 1].
Table 1: Clinical characteristics of patient with unprovoked seizure

Click here to view


There should be no haste in starting AED following a FUS considering the side effects of AEDs, particularly subtle cognitive and behavioral side effects. [1] Neurological examination was normal in 92.5% patients as in the study by Hui et al. [2] 37.5% children with abnormal EEG had recurrence compared to 45% children and 20% patients who presented with SE had recurrence compared with 50% in the study by Shinnar et al. [3] 13.3% on AED had recurrence as compared to 6 (24.0%) out of 25 patients without AED compared to 54.8% and 45.3%, respectively in other study. [4] Our study suggests that, risk of recurrence after "FUS" is less despite of age of presentation, type of seizure, presentation as status epilepticus, treatment with or without anticonvulsants. So anticonvulsants need not be started after "FUS."

 
   References Top

1.Hauser WA, Anderson VE, Loewenson RB, McRoberts SM. Seizure recurrence after a first unprovoked seizure. N Engl J Med 1982;307:522-8.  Back to cited text no. 1
    
2.Hui AC, Tang A, Wong KS, Mok V, Kay R. Recurrence after a first untreated seizure in the Hong Kong Chinese population. Epilepsia 2001;42:94-7.  Back to cited text no. 2
    
3.Shinnar S, Berg AT, Moshe SL, O'Dell C, Alemany M, Newstein D, et al. The risk of seizure recurrence after a first unprovoked afebrile seizure in childhood: An extended follow-up. Pediatrics 1996;98:216-25.  Back to cited text no. 3
    
4.Camfield PR, Camfield CS, Dooley JM, Tibbles JA, Fung T, Garner B. Epilepsy after a first unprovoked seizure in childhood. Neurology 1985;35:1657-60.  Back to cited text no. 4
    



 
 
    Tables

  [Table 1]



 

Top
Print this article  Email this article
 
 
  Search
 
  
 
    Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
    Article in PDF (703 KB)
    Citation Manager
    Access Statistics
    Reader Comments
    Email Alert *
    Add to My List *
* Registration required (free)  


    References
    Article Tables

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed1145    
    Printed37    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded98    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal