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 REVIEW ARTICLE
Year : 2013  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 5-10

Vitamin D deficiency in children with epilepsy: Do we need to detect and treat it?


Department of Paediatric Neurology, Leicester Royal Infirmary, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester LE1 5WW, United Kingdom

Correspondence Address:
Pooja Harijan
Department of Paediatric Neurology, Leicester Royal Infirmary, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester LE1 5WW
United Kingdom
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1817-1745.111413

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Children and adolescents treated with antiepileptic drugs are known to have problems with bone metabolism, bone mineral density loss, and 2-3 times the fracture risk of healthy controls. We reviewed the literature regarding bone mineral density in children with epilepsy and vitamin D therapy in children treated with anti-epileptic drugs. Studies of bone mineral density markers in children with epilepsy have mostly found little significant difference in bone mineral density markers in children with epilepsy. They have been limited by small sample size and many of the studies have not corrected for confounding factors such as comorbidities, mobility, nutrition, and obesity. Studies of vitamin D therapy in children with epilepsy have shown little evidence of effect and have been similarly limited by lack of stratification with regard to confounding factors. There is a need for larger studies, using clinically significant outcomes such as fractures, including at risk populations such as symptomatic generalised epilepsy, impaired mobility, and polytherapy. At the present time in the absence of good evidence to the contrary, there remains concern that children with epilepsy are at risk of poor bone health and that vitamin D therapy may be beneficial. As low-dose vitamin D supplementation (400 IU per day) is now recommended for healthy children and it is biologically feasible that children with epilepsy may be at higher risk of clinically significant deficiency, it is important that neurologists ensure that low-dose vitamin D supplementation should be prescribed and compliance followed up in children with epilepsy.






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